802.1 X Authentication Hp Switch



  1. 802.1x Port Authentication
  2. 802.1x Wifi Authentication
  3. 802.1 X Authentication Hp Switches
  4. 802.1 X Authentication Hp Switch Configuration
  5. 802.1x Authentication Mac
  6. 802.1x Authentication Cisco

Port security with 802.1x using HP ProCurve (Aruba) switches and Windows NPS So I'm learning about 802.1x authentication as a means of securing access to the LAN of a client who wants to be PCI compliant (and one part of PCI compliance is securing publicly accessible network jacks). Now if we connect an unknown client (no 802.1x, nor MAC address in the NPS stored), I would expect the machine to be placed in the unauth-vid VLAN. But the switch will keep the port in 'client not allowed on VLAN' state. Solution would be to configurate a port either for 802.1x or mac-based authentication. ■Local authentication of 802.1X clients using the switch’s local user- name and password (as an alternative to RADIUS authentication). ■Temporary on-demand change of a port’s VLAN membership status to support a current client’s session. (This does not include ports that are members of a trunk.). In the following example, switch Rack2sw1 is configured as the 802.1X authenticator and switch Rack2sw2 as the supplicant. Extensible Authentication Protocol Over LAN (EAPOL) is used to authenticate the connection. The configuration, verification, and testing associated with the diagram follows:. 802.1x Configuration.

802.1x Port Authentication

From what it sounds like, you may need to check the certificate you are using in Protected EAP. At least that is where I would start my search for the answer.

To configure PEAP and EAP methods

1. Open Internet Authentication Service and, if necessary, double-click Internet Authentication Service.


2. In the console tree, click Remote Access Policies.


3. In the details pane, double-click the policy that you want to configure.


4. Click Edit Profile.


5. On the Authentication tab, click EAP Methods.


6. In Select EAP providers, click Add. Select the authentication methods that you want to use, and then click OK.


7. In Select EAP providers, click the EAP type that you want to configure, and then click Edit. Depending on the EAP type selected, one of the following dialog boxes is displayed:

• If Protected EAP (PEAP) is selected, the Protected EAP Properties dialog box opens. In Certificate Issued, select the certificate that the server uses to identify itself to client computers. To enable PEAP fast reconnect for 802.11 wireless client computers, click Enable Fast Reconnect. Secure password user authentication with EAP-MSCHAPv2 is the default in EAP Types. To configure EAP-MSCHAPv2 properties, click Edit. To configure certificate or smart card user authentication click Add. In Authentication methods, click Smart Card or other certificate, and then click OK.


• If Smart Card or other Certificate Properties is selected, the Smart Card or other Certificate Properties dialog box opens. In Certificate issued to, select the certificate that the server uses to authenticate to client computers.

8. In Select EAP providers, click Move Up or Move Down to specify the negotiation order of EAP methods. The server starts negotiation with the client according to the order specified in EAP types.

This section describes how to use the 802.1X Open VLAN mode to provide a path for clients that need to acquire 802.1X supplicant software before proceeding with the authentication process. The Open VLAN mode involves options for configuring unauthorized-client and authorized-client VLANs on ports configured as 802.1X authenticators.

Configuring the 802.1X Open VLAN mode on a port changes how the port responds when it detects a new client. In earlier releases, a “friendly” client computer not running 802.1X supplicant software could not be authenticated on a port protected by 802.1X access security. As a result, the port would become blocked and the client could not access the network. This prevented the client from:

  • Acquiring IP addressing from a DHCP server

  • Downloading the 802.1X supplicant software necessary for an authentication session

The 802.1X Open VLAN mode solves this problem by temporarily suspending the port’s static VLAN memberships and placing the port in a designated Unauthorized-Client VLAN (sometimes termed a guest VLAN). In this state the client can proceed with initialization services, such as acquiring IP addressing and 802.1X client software, and starting the authentication process.

NOTE: On ports configured to allow multiple sessions using 802.1X user-based access control, all clients must use the same untagged VLAN. On a given port where there are no currently active, authenticated clients, the first authenticated client determines the untagged VLAN in which the port will operate for all subsequent, overlapping client sessions.

If the switch operates in an environment where some valid clients will not be running 802.1X supplicant software and need to download it from your network. Then, because such clients would need to use the Unauthorized-Client VLAN and authenticated clients would be using a different VLAN (for security reasons), allowing multiple clients on an 802.1X port can result in blocking some or all clients needing to use the Unauthorized-Client VLAN.

On ports configured for port-based 802.1X access control, if multiple clients try to authenticate on the same port, the most recently authenticated client determines the untagged VLAN membership for that port. Clients that connect without trying to authenticate will have access to the untagged VLAN membership that is currently assigned to the port.

Following client authentication, an 802.1X port resumes membership in any tagged VLANs for which it is already assigned in the switch configuration. The port also becomes an untagged member of one VLAN according to the following order of options:

  • 1st Priority: The port joins a VLAN to which it has been assigned by a RADIUS server during client authentication.

  • 2nd Priority: If RADIUS authentication does not include assigning the port to a VLAN, then the switch assigns the port to the VLAN entered in the port’s 802.1X configuration as an Authorized-Client VLAN, if configured.

  • 3rd Priority: If the port does not have an Authorized-Client VLAN configured, but does have a static, untagged VLAN membership in its configuration, then the switch assigns the port to this VLAN.

A port assigned to a VLAN by an Authorized-Client VLAN configuration (or a RADIUS server) will be an untagged member of the VLAN for the duration of the authenticated session. This applies even if the port is also configured in the switch as a tagged member of the same VLAN.

NOTE: After client authentication, the port resumes membership in any tagged VLANs for which it is configured. If the port is a tagged member of a VLAN used for 1 or 2 listed above, then it also operates as an untagged member of that VLAN while the client is connected. When the client disconnects, the port reverts to tagged membership in the VLAN.

You can apply the 802.1X Open VLAN mode in more than one way. Depending on your use, you will need to create one or two static VLANs on the switch for exclusive use by per-port 802.1X Open VLAN mode authentication:

  • Unauthorized-Client VLAN: Configure this VLAN when unauthenticated, friendly clients will need access to some services before being authenticated or instead of being authenticated.

  • Authorized-Client VLAN: Configure this VLAN for authenticated clients when the port is not statically configured as an untagged member of a VLAN you want clients to use, or when the port is statically configured as an untagged member of a VLAN you do not want clients to use. (A port can be configured as untagged on only one port-based VLAN. When an Authorized-Client VLAN is configured, it will always be untagged and will block the port from using a statically configured, untagged membership in another VLAN.) Note that after client authentication, the port returns to membership in any tagged VLANs for which it is configured. See “Note”.

802.1x computer authentication

802.1x Wifi Authentication

802.1x per-port configuration

802.1X per-port configurationPort response
No Open VLAN mode:The port automatically blocks a client that cannot initiate an authentication session.
Open VLAN mode with both of the following configured:Unauthorized-client VLAN:
  • When the port detects a client without 802.1X supplicant capability, it automatically becomes an untagged member of this VLAN. If you previously configured the port as a static, tagged member of the VLAN, membership temporarily changes to untagged while the client remains unauthenticated.

  • If the port already has a statically configured, untagged membership in another VLAN, then the port temporarily closes access to this other VLAN while in the Unauthorized-Client VLAN.

  • To limit security risks, the network services and access available on the Unauthorized-Client VLAN should include only what a client needs to enable an authentication session. If the port is statically configured as a tagged member of any other VLANs, access to these VLANs is blocked while the port is a member of the Unauthorized-Client VLAN.

NOTE:For a port configured to allow multiple client sessions: If any previously authenticated clients are using a port assigned to a VLAN other than the Unauthorized-Client VLAN, then a later client that is not running 802.1X supplicant software is blocked on the port until all other, authenticated clients on the port have disconnected.

Authorized-client VLAN:
  • After client authentication, the port drops membership in the Unauthorized-Client VLAN and becomes an untagged member of this VLAN.

    NOTE: If the client is running an 802.1X supplicant application when the authentication session begins, and is able to authenticate itself before the switch assigns the port to the Unauthorized-Client VLAN, then the port does not become a member of the Unauthorized-Client VLAN. On the switches covered in this guide, you can use the unauth-period command to delay moving the port into the Unauthorized-Client VLAN.

    If RADIUS authentication assigns a VLAN and there are no other authenticated clients on the port, then the port becomes a member of the RADIUS-assigned VLAN—instead of the Authorized-Client VLAN—while the client is connected.

  • If the port is statically configured as a tagged member of a VLAN, and this VLAN is used as the Authorized-Client VLAN, then the port temporarily becomes an untagged member of this VLAN when the client becomes authenticated.

  • If the port is statically configured as a tagged member of a VLAN, the port returns to tagged membership in this VLAN upon successful authentication. This happens even if the RADIUS server assigns the port to another, authorized VLAN. If the port is already configured as a tagged member of a VLAN that RADIUS assigns as an authorized VLAN, then the port becomes an untagged member of that VLAN for the duration of the client connection.

Open VLAN mode with only an unauthorized-client VLAN configured:
  • When the port detects a client, it automatically becomes an untagged member of this VLAN. To limit security risks, the network services and access available on this VLAN should include only what a client needs to enable an authentication session. If the port is statically configured as an untagged member of another VLAN, the switch temporarily removes the port from membership in this other VLAN while membership in the Unauthorized-Client VLAN exists.

  • After the client is authenticated, and if the port is statically configured as an untagged member of another VLAN, the port’s access to this other VLAN is restored.

    NOTE: If RADIUS authentication assigns the port to a VLAN, this assignment overrides any statically configured, untagged VLAN membership on the port (while the client is connected).

  • If the port is statically configured as a tagged member of a VLAN, the port returns to tagged membership in this VLAN upon successful client authentication. This happens even if the RADIUS server assigns the port to another, authorized VLAN. Note that if the port is already configured as a tagged member of a VLAN that RADIUS assigns as an authorized VLAN, then the port becomes an untagged member of that VLAN for the duration of the client connection.

NOTE:For a port configured to allow multiple client sessions: If any previously authenticated clients are using a port assigned to a VLAN other than the Unauthorized-Client VLAN (such as a RADIUS-assigned VLAN), then a later client that is not running 802.1X supplicant software is blocked on the port until all other, authenticated clients on the port have disconnected.

Open VLAN mode with only an authorized-client VLAN configured:
  • Port automatically blocks a client that cannot initiate an authentication session.

  • If the client successfully completes an authentication session, the port becomes an untagged member of this VLAN.

  • If the port is statically configured as a tagged member of any other VLAN, the port returns to tagged membership in this VLAN upon successful client authentication. This happens even if the RADIUS server assigns the port to another, authorized VLAN. If the port is already configured as a tagged member of a VLAN that RADIUS assigns as an authorized VLAN, then the port becomes an untagged member of that VLAN for the duration of the client connection.

NOTE: An authorized-client VLAN configuration can be overridden by a RADIUS authentication that assigns a VLAN.

Operating rules for authorized and unauthorized-client VLANs

Condition for authorized client and unauthorized client VLANs

ConditionRule
Static VLANs used as authorized-client or unauthorized-client VLANs

These must be configured on the switch before you configure an 802.1X authenticator port to use them. (Use the vlan <vlan-id> command or the VLAN Menu screen in the Menu interface.)

VLAN assignment received from a RADIUS server

If the RADIUS server specifies a VLAN for an authenticated supplicant connected to an 802.1X authenticator port, this VLAN assignment overrides any Authorized-Client VLAN assignment configured on the authenticator port. This is because membership in both VLANs is untagged, and the switch allows only one untagged, port-based VLAN membership per-port. For example, suppose you configured port A4 to place authenticated supplicants in VLAN 20. If a RADIUS server authenticates supplicant “A” and assigns this supplicant to VLAN 50, then the port can access VLAN 50 as an untagged member while the client session is running. When the client disconnects from the port, then the port drops these assignments and uses the untagged VLAN memberships for which it is statically configured. (After client authentication, the port resumes any tagged VLAN memberships for which it is already configured.

Temporary VLAN membership during a client session
  • Port membership in a VLAN assigned to operate as the Unauthorized-Client VLAN is temporary, and ends when the client receives authentication or the client disconnects from the port, whichever is first. In the case of the multiple clients allowed on switches covered in this guide, the first client to authenticate determines the untagged VLAN membership for the port until all clients have disconnected. Any other clients that cannot operate in that VLAN are blocked at that point.

  • Port membership in a VLAN assigned to operate as the Authorized-Client VLAN ends when the client disconnects from the port. If a VLAN assignment from a RADIUS server is used instead, the same rule applies. In the case of the multiple clients allowed on switches, the port maintains the same VLAN as long as there is any authenticated client using the VLAN. When the last client disconnects, then the port reverts to only the VLAN(s) for which it is statically configured as a member.

Effect of unauthorized-client VLAN session on untagged port VLAN membership
  • When an unauthenticated client connects to a port that is already configured with a static, untagged VLAN, the switch temporarily moves the port to the Unauthorized-Client VLAN (also untagged). (While the Unauthorized-Client VLAN is in use, the port does not access any other VLANs.)

  • If the client disconnects, the port leaves the Unauthorized-Client VLAN and re-acquires membership in all the statically configured VLANs to which it belongs.

  • If the client becomes authenticated, the port leaves the Unauthenticated-Client VLAN and joins the appropriate VLAN. See VLAN membership priorities.

  • In the case of the multiple clients allowed on switches, if an authenticated client is already using the port for a different VLAN, then any other unauthenticated clients needing to use the Unauthorized-Client VLAN are blocked.

Effect of authorized-client VLAN session on untagged port VLAN membership.
  • When a client becomes authenticated on a port that is already configured with a static, untagged VLAN, the switch temporarily moves the port to the Authorized-Client VLAN (also untagged). While the Authorized-Client VLAN is in use, the port does not have access to the statically configured, untagged VLAN.

  • When the authenticated client disconnects, the switch removes the port from the Authorized-Client VLAN and moves it back to the untagged membership in the statically configured VLAN. (After client authentication, the port resumes any tagged VLAN memberships for which it is already configured.

NOTE: This rule assumes:

  • No alternate VLAN has been assigned by a RADIUS server.

  • No other authenticated clients are already using the port.


Multiple authenticator ports using the same unauthorized-client and authorized-client VLANs

You can use the same static VLAN as the Unauthorized-Client VLAN for all 802.1X authenticator ports configured on the switch. Similarly, you can use the same static VLAN as the Authorized-Client VLAN for all 802.1X authenticator ports configured on the switch.

CAUTION: Do not use the same static VLAN for both the unauthorized-client VLAN and the authorized-client VLAN. Using one VLAN for both creates a security risk by defeating the isolation of unauthenticated clients.

Effect of filed client authentication attempt

This rule assumes no other authenticated clients are already using the port on a different VLAN.

When there is an Unauthorized-Client VLAN configured on an 802.1X authenticator port, an unauthorized client connected to the port has access only to the network resources belonging to the Unauthorized- Client VLAN. This access continues until the client disconnects from the port. (If there is no Unauthorized-Client VLAN configured on the authenticator port, the port simply blocks access for any unauthorized client.)

Effect of RADIUS-assigned VLAN

This rule assumes no other authenticated clients are already using the port on a different VLAN.

The port joins the RADIUS-assigned VLAN as an untagged member.

IP Addressing for a client connected to a port configured for 802.x Open VLAN mode

A client can either acquire an IP address from a DHCP server or use a manually configured IP address before connecting to the switch.

802.1X supplicant software for a client connected to a port configured for 802.1X Open VLAN mode

A friendly client, without 802.1X supplicant software, connecting to an authenticator port must be able to download this software from the Unauthorized-Client VLAN before authentication can begin.

Switch with a port configured to allow multiple authorized-client sessions

When a new client is authenticated on a given port:

  • If no other clients are authenticated on that port, then the port joins one VLAN in the following order of precedence:

    1. A RADIUS-assigned VLAN, if configured.

    2. An Authenticated-Client VLAN, if configured.

    3. A static, port-based VLAN to which the port belongs as an untagged member.

    4. Any VLAN(s) to which the port is configured as a tagged member (provided that the client can operate in that VLAN).

  • If another client is already authenticated on the port, then the port is already assigned to a VLAN for the previously-existing client session, and the new client must operate in this same VLAN, regardless of other factors. (This means that a client without 802.1X client authentication software cannot access a configured, Unauthenticated-Client VLAN if another, authenticated client is already using the port.)

Limitation on using an unauthorized-client VLAN on an 802.1X port configured to allow multiple-client access

You can optionally enable switches to allow up to 32 clients per-port. The Unauthorized-Client VLAN feature can operate on an 802.1X-configured port regardless of how many clients the port is configured to support. However, all clients on the same port must operate through the same untagged VLAN membership.

(See MAC-based VLANs).

This means that any client accessing a given port must be able to authenticate and operate on the same VLAN as any other previously authenticated clients that are currently using the port. Thus, an Unauthorized-Client VLAN configured on a switch port that allows multiple 802.1X clients cannot be used if there is already an authenticated client using the port on another VLAN. Also, a client using the Unauthenticated-Client VLAN will be blocked when another client becomes authenticated on the port. For this reason, the best utilization of the Unauthorized-Client VLAN feature is in instances where only one client is allowed per-port. Otherwise, unauthenticated clients are subject to being blocked at any time by authenticated clients using a different VLAN. (Using the same VLAN for authenticated and unauthenticated clients can create a security risk and is not recommended.)

NOTE: If you use the same VLAN as the Unauthorized-Client VLAN for all authenticator ports, unauthenticated clients on different ports can communicate with each other.

Preparation:

This section assumes use of both the unauthorized-client and authorized-client VLANs.

Before you configure the 802.1X Open VLAN mode on a port:

  • Statically configure an Unauthorized-Client VLAN in the switch. The only ports that should belong to this VLAN are ports offering services and access you want available to unauthenticated clients. (802.1X authenticator ports do not have to be members of this VLAN.)

    CAUTION: Do not allow any port memberships or network services on this VLAN that would pose a security risk if exposed to an unauthorized client.

  • Statically configure an Authorized-Client VLAN in the switch. The only ports that should belong to this VLAN are ports offering services and access you want available to authenticated clients. 802.1X authenticator ports do not have to be members of this VLAN.

    Note that if an 802.1X authenticator port is an untagged member of another VLAN, the port’s access to that other VLAN will be temporarily removed while an authenticated client is connected to the port.

    For example, if:

    1. Port 5 is an untagged member of VLAN 1 (the default VLAN).

    2. You configure port 5 as an 802.1X authenticator port.

    3. You configure port 5 to use an Authorized-Client VLAN.

    Then, if a client connects to port 5 and is authenticated, port 5 becomes an untagged member of the Authorized-Client VLAN and is temporarily suspended from membership in the default VLAN.

  • If you expect friendly clients to connect without having 802.1X supplicant software running, provide a server on the Unauthorized-Client VLAN for downloading 802.1X supplicant software to the client, and a procedure by which the client initiates the download.

  • A client must either have a valid IP address configured before connecting to the switch, or download one through the Unauthorized-Client VLAN from a DHCP server. In the latter case, you will need to provide DHCP services on the Unauthorized-Client VLAN.

  • Ensure that the switch is connected to a RADIUS server configured to support authentication requests from clients using ports configured as 802.1X authenticators. (The RADIUS server should not be on the Unauthorized-Client VLAN.)

    NOTE: As an alternative, you can configure the switch to use local password authentication instead of RADIUS authentication. However, this is less desirable because it means that all clients use the same passwords and have the same access privileges. Also, you must use 802.1X supplicant software that supports the use of local switch passwords.

    CAUTION: Ensure that you do not introduce a security risk by allowing Unauthorized- Client VLAN access to network services or resources that could be compromised by an unauthorized client.

802.1 X Authentication Hp Switches

These steps enable 802.1X authentication, and must be done before configuring 802.1X VLAN operation.

  1. Enable 802.1X authentication on the individual ports you want to serve as authenticators. (The switch automatically disables LACP on the ports on which you enable 802.1X.) On the ports you will use as authenticators with VLAN operation, ensure that the port-control parameter is set to auto (the default). (See Enable 802.1X authentication on selected ports.) This setting requires a client to support 802.1X authentication (with 802.1X supplicant operation) and to provide valid credentials to get network access.

    Syntax:

    aaa port-access authenticator <port-list> control auto

    Activates 802.1X port-access on ports you have configured as authenticators.

  2. Configure the 802.1X authentication type. Options include:

    Syntax:

    aaa authentication port-access <local|eap-radius|chap-radius>

    Determines the type of RADIUS authentication to use.

    local

    Use the switch’s local username and password for supplicant authentication (the default).

    eap-radius

    Use EAP-RADIUS authentication, (see the documentation for your RADIUS server.)

    chap-radius

    Use CHAP-RADIUS (MD5) authentication, (see the documentation for your RADIUS server software.)

  3. If you selected either eap-radius or chap-radius for step 2, use the radius host command to configure up to three RADIUS server IP address(es) on the switch.

    Syntax:

    Adds a server to the RADIUS configuration.

    The oobm option specifies that the RADIUS traffic will go through the out-of-band management (OOBM) port.

    Optional. Specifies an encryption key for use with the specified server. This key must match the key used on the RADIUS server. Use this option only if the specified server requires a different key than configured for the global encryption key The tilde (~) character is allowed in the string. It is not backward compatible; the “~” character is lost if you use a software version that does not support the “~” character.

    Syntax:

    Specifies the global encryption key the switch uses for sessions with servers for which the switch does not have a server-specific key. This key is optional if all RADIUS server addresses configured in the switch include a server- specific encryption key. The tilde (~) character is allowed in the string, for example, radius-server key hp~switch. It is not backward compatible; the “~” character is lost if you use a software version that does not support the “~” character.

    Default: Null

    The no form of the command removes the global encryption key.

  4. Activate authentication on the switch.

    Syntax:

    Activates 802.1X port-access on ports you have configured as authenticators.

  5. Test both the authorized and unauthorized access to your system to ensure that the 802.1X authentication works properly on the ports you have configured for port-access.

NOTE: If you want to implement the optional port-security feature on the switch, you should first ensure that the ports you have configured as 802.1X authenticators operate as expected. Then see Option for authenticator ports: configure port-security to allow only 802.1X-authenticated devices.

802.1 X Authentication Hp Switch Configuration

After you complete steps 1 and 2, the configured ports are enabled for 802.1X authentication (without VLAN operation), and you are ready to configure VLAN Operation.

Use these commands to actually configure Open VLAN mode. For a listing of the steps needed to prepare the switch for using Open VLAN mode, see Setting up and configuring 802.1X Open VLAN mode.

Syntax:

Configures an existing, static VLAN to be the Authorized-Client VLAN.

[<unauth-vid <vlan-id>]

Configures an existing, static VLAN to be the Unauthorized-Client VLAN.

802.1x Authentication Mac

For example, suppose you want to configure 802.1X port-access with Open VLAN mode on ports 10-20 and

  • These two static VLANs already exist on the switch:

  • Your RADIUS server has an IP address of 10.28.127.101. The server uses rad4all as a server-specific key string. The server is connected to a port on the Default VLAN.

  • The switch's default VLAN is already configured with an IP address of 10.28.127.100 and a network mask of 255.255.255.0

Configures the switch for 802.1X authentication using an EAP-RADIUS server.

Configures ports 10 - 20 as 802.1 authenticator ports.

Configures the switch to look for a RADIUS server with an IP address of 10.28.127.101 and an encryption key of rad4all.

Configures ports 10 - 20 to use VLAN 80 as the Unauthorized-Client VLAN.

Configures ports 10 - 20 to use VLAN 81 as the Authorized-Client VLAN.

Activates 802.1X port-access on ports you have configured as authenticators.

For information and an example on viewing current Open VLAN mode operation, see Viewing 802.1X Open VLAN mode status.

802.1x Authentication Cisco

  • Although you can configure Open VLAN mode to use the same VLAN for both the Unauthorized-Client VLAN and the Authorized-Client VLAN, this is not recommended. Using the same VLAN for both purposes allows unauthenticated clients access to a VLAN intended only for authenticated clients, which poses a security breach.

  • While an Unauthorized-Client VLAN is in use on a port, the switch temporarily removes the port from any other statically configured VLAN for which that port is configured as a member. Note that the Menu interface will still display the port’s statically configured VLAN(s).

  • A VLAN used as the Unauthorized-Client VLAN should not allow access to resources that must be protected from unauthenticated clients.

  • If a port is configured as a tagged member of VLAN “X”, then the port returns to tagged membership in VLAN “X” upon successful client authentication. This happens even if the RADIUS server assigns the port to another, authorized VLAN “Y”. Note that if RADIUS assigns VLAN “X” as an authorized VLAN, then the port becomes an untagged member of VLAN “X” for the duration of the client connection. (If there is no Authorized-Client or RADIUS-assigned VLAN, then an authenticated client without tagged VLAN capability can access only a statically configured, untagged VLAN on that port.)

  • When a client’s authentication attempt on an Unauthorized-Client VLAN fails, the port remains a member of the Unauthorized-Client VLAN until the client disconnects from the port.

  • During an authentication session on a port in 802.1X Open VLAN mode, if RADIUS specifies membership in an untagged VLAN, this assignment overrides port membership in the Authorized-Client VLAN. If there is no Authorized-Client VLAN configured, then the RADIUS assignment overrides any untagged VLAN for which the port is statically configured.

  • If the only authenticated client on a port loses authentication during a session in 802.1X Open VLAN mode, the port VLAN membership reverts back to the Unauthorized-Client VLAN. If there is no Unauthorized-Client VLAN configured, then the client loses access to the port until it can reauthenticate itself. If there are multiple clients authenticated on the port, if one client loses access and attempts to re-authenticate, that client will be handled as a new client on the port.

  • The first client to authenticate on a port configured to support multiple clients will determine the port’s VLAN membership for any subsequent clients that authenticate while an active session is already in effect.