Download Git Extensions For Mac



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Azure DevOps Services | Azure DevOps Server 2020 | Azure DevOps Server 2019 | TFS 2018 - TFS 2013

Learn about the tools and clients that connect to Azure DevOps.

A intuitive, fast, and beautiful cross-platform Git client, of which the free version can. Brackets is a lightweight, yet powerful, modern text editor. We blend visual tools into the editor so you get the right amount of help when you want it. With new features and extensions released every 3-4 weeks, it's like getting presents all year long.

Our platform of software development tools began more than 20 years ago. We released Visual Basic and Visual Studio as an integrated development environment (IDE). Visual Studio supports many plug-ins that extend its functionality. In particular, the Team Explorer plug-in allows the Visual Studio client to connect to Azure DevOps to support source control, work tracking, build, and test operations.

We recommend installing Git through Homebrew and using the Homebrew tools to keep Git up to date. Homebrew is a great way to install and manage open source development tools on your Mac from the command line. Install Homebrew and run the following to install an up to date version of Git on your Mac: brew install git.

The available tools that communicate with Azure DevOps are included as follows:

  • Desktop client developer tools
  • Office integration tools
  • Web-based tools
  • Command-line tools
  • Marketplace extensions
  • REST APIs

Desktop client developer tools

Developers have access to many tools through these versions of Visual Studio and plug-ins. To download any version of Visual Studio, go to the Visual Studio Downloads page. To understand what features you get with the Visual Studio versions, see Compare Visual Studio offerings.

  • Visual Studio Community: A fully featured and extensible IDE for creating modern applications for Android, iOS, and Windows, including web applications and cloud services. (Replaces Visual Studio Express.)
  • Visual Studio Professional: Development tools and services to support individual developers or small teams.
  • Visual Studio Enterprise: Integrated, end-to-end development tools and solutions for teams of any size, and with a need to scale. It supports designing, building, and managing complex enterprise applications.
  • Visual Studio Test Professional: Provides access to Microsoft Test and development tools to support quality and collaboration throughout the development process.
  • Visual Studio Team Explorer: Free solution for non-developers to interact with Team Foundation Server and Visual Studio Team Services.
  • Eclipse/Team Explorer Everywhere: Free plug in to support teams running Eclipse on Linux, macOS, or Windows that connects to Azure DevOps.
  • Android Studio with the Azure DevOps Services Plug-in for Android Studio: Free plug in to support Android developers and connect to Git repositories on Azure DevOps.
  • IntelliJ with the Azure DevOps Services Plugin for IntelliJ: Free plug in to support developers who use IntelliJ IDEA or Android Studio to connect to Git repositories on Azure DevOps.
  • Visual Studio Code: Free, open-source code editor with a free extension to support connecting to Git repositories on Azure DevOps.

To get started with client libraries, see Client library samples.

Git

Team Explorer plug-in

Team Explorer, a plug-in to all Visual Studio versions, connects Visual Studio to projects defined in Azure DevOps. You can manage source code, work items, and builds. To learn more, see Work in Team Explorer.

Office integration tools

Git on mac

You can integrate the following Microsoft Office tools with Azure DevOps.

  • Excel: Use Excel to add and bulk modify work items.
  • Project: By using Project, you can plan projects, schedule tasks, assign resources, and track changes. You have access to additional features, such as a project calendar, Gantt charts, and resource views.
  • Project Professional: With Project Professional, project managers and software development teams can use the tools that they prefer, work at the level of precision that supports their needs, and easily share information.

Important

Starting with Visual Studio 2019, the Team Foundation plug-in for Office is deprecating support for Microsoft Project. Project integration and the TFSFieldMapping command is not supported for Azure DevOps Server 2019 nor for Azure DevOps Services. However, you can continue to use Microsoft Excel.

  • Excel: Use Excel to add and bulk modify work items.
  • Project: By using Project, you can plan projects, schedule tasks, assign resources, and track changes. You have access to additional features, such as a project calendar, Gantt charts, and resource views.
  • Project Professional: With Project Professional, project managers and software development teams can use the tools that they prefer, work at the level of precision that supports their needs, and easily share information.
  • PowerPoint Storyboarding: Illustrate user stories and requirements by using PowerPoint.

Tip

Check to make sure the Azure DevOps Office Integration component is selected in the Visual Studio Installer, per the following example.

When you install any edition of Visual Studio or Team Foundation Server Standalone Office Integration 2015 (free), the Team Foundation plug-in integrates work item tracking with select Office clients. The Team Foundation plug-in installs to your existing Office client. The plug-in supports Office 2007, Office 2010, or Office 2013 versions.

  • Excel: Use Excel to add and bulk modify work items.
  • Project: By using Project, you can plan projects, schedule tasks, assign resources, and track changes. You have access to features that TFS doesn't support, such as a project calendar, Gantt charts, and resource views.
  • PowerPoint Storyboarding: Illustrate user stories and requirements by using PowerPoint. The Team Foundation plug-in installs to your existing PowerPoint client.
  • Project Professional: With Project Professional and the Team Foundation Server Extensions for Project Server, you can manage projects that synchronize data that exists in both TFS and Project Server. Project managers and software development teams can use the tools that they prefer, work at the level of precision that supports their needs, and easily share information.

Important

Support for integrating TFS with Project Server is deprecated for TFS 2017. However, synchronization support is provided by a Microsoft partner. See Synchronize TFS with Project Server for details.

Task-specific clients

The following clients support specific tasks, such as managing testing efforts, providing feedback, or modifying work items:

  • Azure Test Plans: Manage your test efforts, create and run manual tests, and create and track bugs that are found during test efforts. Test Plans is installed with Visual Studio Test Professional and Visual Studio Enterprise.
  • Test & Feedback extension (previously called the Exploratory Testing extension): This extension provides a lightweight plug-in to a web browser. Stakeholders can respond to feedback requests for user stories and features created in Azure DevOps. This extension is free to Stakeholders.
  • Microsoft Feedback Client: Your Stakeholders can use this client to record feedback for your application as video, audio, or type-written comments. This client is installed with all versions of Visual Studio, or it can be installed from the free download. All feedback is stored in the work item data store and requires Stakeholders to have permissions.

Browser-based web tools

Web portal

The collaboration tools supported through the web portal are summarized under Essential services. New features are deployed every three weeks for Azure DevOps Services, and quarterly for Azure DevOps Server. For release notes, see Azure DevOps Services Features Timeline.

You can use the following browsers to access the web portal:

VersionMicrosoft EdgeInternet ExplorerSafari (Mac)FirefoxChrome
Azure DevOps Servicesmost recent11 and later9.1 and latermost recentmost recent
Azure DevOps Server 2019most recent11 and later9.1 and latermost recentmost recent
TFS 2018most recent11 and later9.1 and latermost recentmost recent
TFS 2015most recent9 and later5 and latermost recentmost recent
TFS 20139 and later5 and latermost recentmost recent

Microsoft Edge, Firefox, and Chrome automatically update themselves, so Azure DevOps supports the most recent version.

To learn more, see Web portal navigation.

Browser-based extensions

The following extensions are available and are built and maintained by the Azure DevOps Services product team:

  • Azure Test Plans: Run tests by using your browser with simple pass/fail of steps, add comments/attachments, take screenshots, and file bugs. You can accomplish it all with automatic end-to-end traceability.
  • Azure Artifacts: Build packages of reusable code components and share them. The Azure Artifacts extension enables continuous delivery workflows by supporting multiple packaging protocols such as NuGet and npm. It makes packages available to your team, your builds, and your releases.
  • Code search: Increase cross-team collaboration and code sharing. Enables developers to quickly locate relevant information within the code base of all projects that are hosted within an organization or collection. You can discover implementation examples, browsing definitions, and error text.
  • Work item search: To quickly find relevant work items, search across all work item fields over all projects in an organization. Do full-text searches across all fields to efficiently locate relevant work items. Use inline search filters, on any work item field, to quickly narrow down a list of work items.

Find additional extensions in Azure DevOps Organization settings > Extensions > Browse marketplace.

Application monitoring tools

To monitor your applications, you can use Azure Application Insights for web apps or HockeyApp for mobile apps.

Monitor web applications with Application Insights

Application Insights is an extensible application performance management (APM) service for web developers. Use it to monitor your live web application. Application Insights automatically detect performance anomalies. It includes powerful analytics tools to help you diagnose issues and to understand what users actually do with your app. Application Insights is designed to help you continuously improve performance and usability. It works for apps on a wide variety of platforms—including .NET, Node.js, and Java EE—hosted on-premises or in the cloud.

With Application Insights, you can do the following tasks:

  • Gain actionable insights through application performance management and instant analytics
  • Detect and diagnose exceptions and application performance issues
  • Monitor Azure websites, which includes websites hosted in containers, on-premises, and with other cloud providers
  • Seamlessly integrate with your pipeline by using Azure DevOps Services, GitHub, and our webhooks
  • Get started from within Visual Studio, or monitor existing apps without redeploying

To learn more, see Microsoft Azure - Application Insights.

Monitor mobile applications with HockeyApp

With HockeyApp, you can develop, distribute, and beta test your mobile apps. HockeyApp supports the following apps and functionality:

  • Android, Cordova, iOS, macOS, Unity, Windows, and Xamarin apps
  • Live, reliable crash reports
  • Collection of in-app feedback from real users
  • Open-source SDKs to let you know what code is running in your apps
  • Integration with your existing build system and work item management solution

To learn more, see Microsoft Azure - HockeyApp.

Command-line tools

You can do many code development and administrative tasks by using the following command-line tools:

Marketplace extensions

Visual Studio and Azure DevOps provide a wealth of features and functionality. They also provide a means to extend and share that functionality.

Extensions are simple add-ons that you can use to customize and extend your DevOps and work tracking experiences. They're written with standard technologies—HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. You can develop your own extensions by using your preferred dev tools.

You build extensions by using our RESTful API library. Publish your extensions to the Azure DevOps Marketplace. You can privately maintain or share them with millions of developers who use Visual Studio and Azure DevOps.

To learn more, visit the Azure DevOps Marketplace and see Overview of extensions.

REST APIs

The Azure DevOps APIs are based on REST, OAuth, JSON, and service hooks—all standard web technologies broadly supported in the industry.

REST APIs are provided to support building extensions to Azure DevOps. To learn more, see REST API overview.

Related articles

Install Git on Mac OS X

There are several ways to install Git on a Mac. In fact, if you've installed XCode (or it's Command Line Tools), Git may already be installed. To find out, open a terminal and enter git --version.

Apple actually maintain and ship their own fork of Git, but it tends to lag behind mainstream Git by several major versions. You may want to install a newer version of Git using one of the methods below:

Git for Mac Installer

The easiest way to install Git on a Mac is via the stand-alone installer:

  1. Download the latest Git for Mac installer.

  2. Follow the prompts to install Git.

  3. Open a terminal and verify the installation was successful by typing git --version:

  4. Configure your Git username and email using the following commands, replacing Emma's name with your own. These details will be associated with any commits that you create:

  5. (Optional) To make Git remember your username and password when working with HTTPS repositories, configure the git-credential-osxkeychain helper.

Install Git with Homebrew

If you have installed Homebrew to manage packages on OS X, you can follow these instructions to install Git:

  1. Open your terminal and install Git using Homebrew:

  2. Verify the installation was successful by typing which git --version:

  3. Configure your Git username and email using the following commands, replacing Emma's name with your own. These details will be associated with any commits that you create:

  4. (Optional) To make Git remember your username and password when working with HTTPS repositories, install the git-credential-osxkeychain helper.

Install Git with MacPorts

If you have installed MacPorts to manage packages on OS X, you can follow these instructions to install Git:

  1. Open your terminal and update MacPorts:

  2. Search for the latest available Git ports and variants:

  3. Install Git with bash completion, the OS X keychain helper, and the docs:

  4. Configure your Git username and email using the following commands, replacing Emma's name with your own. These details will be associated with any commits that you create:

  5. (Optional) To make Git remember your username and password when working with HTTPS repositories, configure the git-credential-osxkeychain helper.

Install the git-credential-osxkeychain helper

Bitbucket supports pushing and pulling your Git repositories over both SSH and HTTPS. To work with a private repository over HTTPS, you must supply a username and password each time you push or pull. The git-credential-osxkeychain helper allows you to cache your username and password in the OSX keychain, so you don't have to retype it each time.

  1. If you followed the MacPorts or Homebrew instructions above, the helper should already be installed. Otherwise you'll need to download and install it. Open a terminal window and check:

    If you receive a usage statement, skip to step 4. If the helper is not installed, go to step 2.

  2. Use curl to download git-credential-osxkeychain (or download it via your browser) and move it to /usr/local/bin:

  3. Make the file an executable:

  4. Configure git to use the osxkeychain credential helper.

    The next time Git prompts you for a username and password, it will cache them in your keychain for future use.

Install Git with Atlassian Sourcetree

Sourcetree, a free visual Git client for Mac, comes with its own bundled version of Git. You can download Sourcetree here.

To learn how to use Git with Sourcetree (and how to host your Git repositories on Bitbucket) you can follow our comprehensive Git tutorial with Bitbucket and Sourcetree.

Git On Mac

Build Git from source on OS X

Building Git can be a little tricky on Mac due to certain libraries moving around between OS X releases. On El Capitan (OS X 10.11), follow these instructions to build Git:

  1. From your terminal install XCode's Command Line Tools (if you haven't already):

  2. Install Homebrew.

  3. Using Homebrew, install openssl:

  4. Clone the Git source (or if you don't yet have a version of Git installed, download and extract it):

  5. To build Git run make with the following flags:

Install Git on Windows

Git for Windows stand-alone installer

  1. Download the latest Git for Windows installer.

  2. When you've successfully started the installer, you should see the Git Setup wizard screen. Follow the Next and Finish prompts to complete the installation. The default options are pretty sensible for most users.

  3. Open a Command Prompt (or Git Bash if during installation you elected not to use Git from the Windows Command Prompt).

  4. Run the following commands to configure your Git username and email using the following commands, replacing Emma's name with your own. These details will be associated with any commits that you create:

  5. Optional: Install the Git credential helper on Windows

    Bitbucket supports pushing and pulling over HTTP to your remote Git repositories on Bitbucket. Every time you interact with the remote repository, you must supply a username/password combination. You can store these credentials, instead of supplying the combination every time, with the Git Credential Manager for Windows.

Install Git with Atlassian Sourcetree

Sourcetree, a free visual Git client for Windows, comes with its own bundled version of Git. You can download Sourcetree here.

To learn how to use Git with Sourcetree (and how to host your Git repositories on Bitbucket) you can follow our comprehensive Git tutorial with Bitbucket and Sourcetree.

Install Git on Linux

Git extensions plugins

Debian / Ubuntu (apt-get)

Git packages are available via apt:

  1. From your shell, install Git using apt-get:

  2. Verify the installation was successful by typing git --version:

  3. Configure your Git username and email using the following commands, replacing Emma's name with your own. These details will be associated with any commits that you create:

Fedora (dnf/yum)

Git packages are available via both yum and dnf:

  1. From your shell, install Git using dnf (or yum, on older versions of Fedora):

    or

  2. Verify the installation was successful by typing git --version:

  3. Configure your Git username and email using the following commands, replacing Emma's name with your own. These details will be associated with any commits that you create

Build Git from source on Linux

Debian / Ubuntu

Git requires the several dependencies to build on Linux. These are available via apt:

  1. From your shell, install the necessary dependencies using apt-get:

  2. Clone the Git source (or if you don't yet have a version of Git installed, download and extract it):

  3. To build Git and install it under /usr, run make:

Fedora

Git requires the several dependencies to build on Linux. These are available via both yum and dnf:

  1. From your shell, install the necessary build dependencies using dnf (or yum, on older versions of Fedora):

    or using yum. For yum, you may need to install the Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) repository first:

  2. Symlink docbook2X to the filename that the Git build expects:

  3. Clone the Git source (or if you don't yet have a version of Git installed, download and extract it):

  4. To build Git and install it under /usr, run make:

Git Download Mac Os

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